Insecure Car Security Systems?
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Lock Your Car Manually, not With Wireless Remote-Fiction!

Summary of the eRumor:  
This is a warning that crooks can get the code to the wireless locking system on your car.  The email claims it happened to someone in Canada.  While stopped at a roadside park, a man's locked car was easily accessed by someone who stole his cell phone, laptop, GPS, briefcase, and more.  The police allegedly said that robbers were using a device that would clone the security code on the wireless remote that is used for locking and unlocking the car.
 

The Truth:  
TruthOrFiction.com has not found any documented case of a car being broken into by thieves using an electronic cloning device to duplicate the code of a wireless remote.

This eRumor, which began circulating in July, 2008, does not include any information about when, where, and to whom this event occurred.

The experts we consulted says that at the present time, such a criminal event could not happen with most cars.

Virtually all of the cars that unlock with remote keyless devices are protected by an encryption system called Keelog, which scrambles the wireless transmissions so nobody could monitor and clone them. 

According to MSNBC blogger Bob Sullivan, there is a group of researchers in Israel and Belgium who claim to have discovered a way to figure out the coding of a wireless locking system, but it's fairly time consuming and is not being used by thieves.

This eRumor may have been sparked by the memory of some of the original keyless systems first introduced in the 1980s.  They were simpler and it was easier for a hacker to detect the wireless code.

Updated July 28, 2008

A real example of the eRumor as it has appeared on the Internet:

My oldest son came over yesterday- he had to go to Canada for work last week. One of the other engineer's traveling to Canada with him, but in his own car had something happen...that I need to share.

While traveling he stopped at the roadside park, similar to what we have here with bathrooms, vending machines etc. He came out to his car less than 4-5 minutes later and found someone had gotten into his car, and stolen his cell phone, laptop computer, gps navigator, briefcase.....you name it.

They called the police and since there were no signs of his car being broke into- the police told him that there is a device that robbers are using now to clone your security code when you lock your doors on your car using your key-chain locking device. They set a distance away and watch for their next victim. Since they know you are going inside of the store, restaurant, or bathroom and have a few minutes to steal and run. The police office said...to be sure to manually lock your car door-by hitting the lock button inside the car, that way if there is someone setting in a parking lot watching for their next victim it will not be you.

When you hit the lock button on your car upon exiting...it does not send the security code, but if you walk away and use the door lock on your key chain- it sends the code thru the airwaves where it can be stolen.

I just wanted to let you know about this...it is something totally new to us...and this is real...it just happened this past Thursday June 19th to his co-worker...

so be aware of this and please pass this note on...look how many times we all lock our doors with our keys...just to be sure we remembered to lock them....and bingo the guys have our code...and whatever was in the car...can be gone
 

 


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