There Was Widespread Voter Fraud in the 2012 Presidential Election-Fiction!

There Was Widespread Voter Fraud in the 2012 Presidential Election-Fiction!

Summary of eRumor:

This is a forwarded email that cited alleged instances of voter fraud during the 2012 presidential election in an effort to prove voter ID laws are necessary.
 

The Truth:

This eRumor contains a mix of accurate and false data that fails to prove there was widespread voter fraud during the 2012 election.

The eRumor’s claim that President Obama won 100 percent of the vote in 59 districts in Philadelphia is true. In both the 2008 and 2012 elections, the president drew 100 percent of the vote in some districts in Philadelphia that are populated almost entirely by African-American people, CBS News reported.

The claim that Obama lost in every state that required a photo ID to vote in 2012 is also true. Four states had strict ID laws on the books that required voters to show a photo ID to vote at the time: Georgia, Kansas, Tennessee and Indiana.

Official election data from around the country proves the rest of the eRumor’s claims are false.

Poll results from Wood County, Ohio, show that Obama didn’t receive 100 percent of the votes in any district there, which the eRumor claims. Overall, Obama won about 51 percent of the votes in Wood County.

There also were not more votes cast than there are voters in St. Lucie County, Fla., as the eRumor claimed. Official election results show 123,301 votes were cast, and there were 175,554 registered voters. Challenger Mitt Romney earned 56,202 votes and Obama earned 65,869 in St. Lucie County.

The eRumor also alleged there were more votes than registered voters at St. Lucie County’s SEAL Museum polling station, which is not true. The official election results show there were 2,756 registered voters in the district, and there were 2,243 votes cast.
Likewise, the claim that voter turnout was at 141 percent in Palm Beach County, Fla., is false. The
county’s supervisor of elections reported that about 70 percent of registered voters turned out.

Although two of the eRumor’s claims are factually accurate, they fail to demonstrate widespread instances of voter fraud.

Posted 04/01/14