Toxic tampons-Fiction!

Tampons Manufactured in America Have Asbestos in Them And Rayon in Tampons Causes Toxic Shock Syndrome-Fiction!

 

Summary of eRumor:
This email is a warning to women and the writer urges that you send it to “every woman you know.”  It claims that U.S. tampon manufacturers are creating a larger market for their product by adding asbestos to the tampons which creates heavier menstrual flow.  It also claims that there are cases of toxic shock syndrome occurring because of chlorine contamination from the manufacturing process.

The Truth:

The Food and Drug Administration, which regulates the safety of tampons, says there is no truth to the allegation that tampons made in the United States have asbestos in them.  The FDA says it knows of no reports of tampons tainted with asbestos.  Regarding the Rayon and dioxin concerns, the FDA says that’s old news.  U.S. tampons are made of cotton, Rayon or blends of both, according to the FDA.  Rayon comes from a process from wood pulp and there was a time when a bleaching process used on the wood pulp which, according to the FDA, “…was a potential source of trace amounts of dioxin…” but that process is no longer used.  Further, the FDA says that sophisticated testing shows that dioxin levels are at or below the detectable limit.  Additionally, Dr. Stephanie Baker, one of the names listed as having originated the email, says her name has been attached by a hoaxster and that she regards the email as false and had nothing to do with it.   The bottom line is that if you have any concerns about the safety of tampons, this email is not the document on which to base them.

 

Additionally, we contacted Dr. Stephanie Baker and she sent us the following email:
I am Stephanie Baker. A version of a bogus e-mail alerting readers to the alleged dangers of tampons has been circulating with my name on it. I am NOT the author and I disavow myself completely from the content of the e-mail. It was not my intention to further disseminate this FALSE information. When I received the e-mail, I forwarded it to a few friends, commenting on what I felt was the absurdity of the misinformation that it contained. My name became associated with it because I did not realize that the e-mail program I was using at work would drop my electronic signature file (including my office address and phone) to the bottom of the forwarded text, thereby implying that I am its author. Unfortunately however, one of my recipients not only forwarded it, but left my name at the bottom of the text.
In addition, you should be aware that the content of this e-mail is constantly being altered by those who receive it, including moving the placement of my name within the text of the e-mail. One version circulating combines my name with that of a Donna Boisseau, a person unknown to me, whose name was attached to the version of the e-mail that was sent to me.
If you have forwarded this e-mail to others, I would very much appreciate your forwarding this message to anyone you may have sent it to. Thank you!

 

Stephanie Baker

For more information:
The Food and Drug Administration (If this link does not take you to a relevant page, go to www.fda.gov and use the search feature using the keyword “tampons.”
updated 07/17/12